More good news about the Write For Rights campaign

Due to being ill, it took me a few days to notice an email that I received.

It was an update on another of the cases that I wrote about during the Amnesty Write For Rights campaign.  I am quite sure that I mentioned that this was the first case for which I wrote a couple of letters in December last year.

The email is an update of good progress but more still needs to be done.

I hope that this can give us all hope that we can all do just a little bit to contribute to making the World just a little better than before.

It’s also nice for me to find out what happens after I sent those letters.

Here is an excerpt from the email:

Dear Harry,

Maria* was 13 years old when her father forced her to marry a 70-year-old man, a common practice in Burkina Faso.

Her father threatened her saying, “If you don’t go to join your husband, I will kill you.”

Amnesty is working to end child marriage once and for all…With your help, we are making strides.

In response to pressure from letters and actions from activists around the world, the Ministry of Justice, Human Rights and Civic Promotion in Burkina Faso has recently committed to raise the legal age of marriage for girls to 18 years and to ensure that forced marriage is clearly defined in Burkina Faso’s criminal code.

While these promises are a step in the right direction, we need your help to ensure these plans turn into real action.

Maria escaped after spending three days with her husband and his five other wives. She walked 105 miles over three days to get to a shelter.

When her father learned that she had fled, he threatened to attack the priest who helped her escape if she didn’t return home.

When she did return, she was beaten by her father and sent back to live with her husband. She again fled the house on foot and sought refuge at the nearest police station.

Amnesty is advocating for girls like Maria, who have suffered the injustice of early and forced marriage. We are telling their stories and we are holding governments accountable for their safety and well-being.

*Maria is not her real name

13 Comments

      1. It´s a cultural thing. He is protecting his whole family, and yes, he loves his daughter.
        Eighteen years ago, in Spain, my neighbor got pegnant. She was forced to get married because her family couldn´t accept a single mother. Thirty years ago, my mother needed my father´s signature to access the bank account becaues women were not legal entity.
        It´s sad, but this things require time… to change a lot of minds :/

        Liked by 2 people

        1. True. However, it’s not entirely cultural. Malala Yousefzai’s father took no account of his contemporaries and their treatment of their daughters. Look where she’s got to now.

          Things never change unless someone has the courage to change them.

          Liked by 2 people

          1. Our new king became so, thanks to a medieval catholic law that prevents women from the throne.
            Years ago, the government changed the constitution in order to pay the debt. They didn´t take the opportunity to fix it. Spanish society is stationary, we´re not a good example 🙂
            Everything is cultural, mostly revolutions against the stablishment 🙂
            What did Malala do? Educate girls.
            What does any revolutionary do? Educate. New patterns, beliefs, knowledge, and behaviors: culture.

            Liked by 1 person

    1. It really is. This is the stuff of living nightmares.

      I agonise over the pain that those girls who, were they to live in the UK, would be no more than school children. Although, sadly, there are girls that suffer abuses physical and sexual even in the UK.

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  1. Wow! We often times become unaware that things like this are happening in the world. Out of sight and out of mind! My heart goes out to this young lady and those like her. Just a reminder that prayer is needed and should be continuous not for just the USA but abroad…

    Liked by 1 person

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